Testing Modern Technologies for Inverted Classes in Healthcare Teaching

Background

Inverted classroom, a flipped classroom model for higher education, is a form of blended learning consisting of self-learning classroom instruction. The learning phase is focused on factual knowledge and can be drawn from online multimedia support whereas the face-to-face classroom phase is designed to help assimilate and implement the acquired knowledge. Its aim is to pass from passive learning to active learning that requires more demanding competencies and cognitive learning process such as analysis, synthesis and evaluation. The approach promotes self-reflection, debate and teamwork: competencies that are often required in health professions. The model has been implemented successfully in many medical school programs. However, little is known on the use of modern technologies and distance learning in an inversed classroom setting. Benefits of using such models are to help students address and overcome cultural and language challenges when managing clinical cases.

Aim

The aim of this project is to develop distance learning materials and technologies to support students to learn and apply concepts of evidence informed individualised patient care. This project will focus on developing and testing technologies and teaching concepts for an innovative distant learning educational programme on how to recognise, understand and manage cultural and social differences when facilitating patient centred decisions. This is to be achieved through the collaboration of two higher education institutions teaching primary healthcare in Russia and Switzerland and by integrating multimedia into existing inverted classroom model that covers socio-cultural challenges in clinical practice.

Through this innovative approach, technologies could be used to help the students:

  1. Develop skills for managing complex psychosocial situations in different cultural context
  2. Learn to reframe treatment approaches depending of the health care system
  3. Learn to listen to patients and adapt treatment plan depending of patients’ socio-cultural framework.
  4. Practice communication skills when communicating with someone from another culture.

Methods

This proof-of-principle study is to rely on a mixed methods design approach to test the feasibility of implementing an inverted classroom using multi-media technologies between two cultures, that of Switzerland and Russia. We will develop, implement and pilot test the new program on students from both institutions in autumn of 2018 and in spring 2019. The students will be followed-up for one year.

The project is organised in four stages:

Stage 1. Define teaching goals and educational package.

We will conduct qualitative interviews with 5–10 educators in both schools. We will extract information pertaining key learning outcomes and course content and then re-present the data to the educators to test these and seek consensus using a modified Delphi consensus approach.

Stage 2. Develop teaching material and implementation

The course will be designed and organised using the following template for the inverted classroom:

  1. The students are presented with the clinical situation (vignette) and attached documents (exams, reports, etc.)
  2. Groups of 10 students are then given 3-5 underlying concepts to investigate (one per 2-3 students) on their own using online support (guidelines, videos, publications, etc.).
  3. A theoretical restitution is organised with the lecturer as a facilitator
  4. Students practice palpation, clinical exams and techniques under the lecturer’s supervision with simulated situations and peer feedback.

We will seek feedback from the educators by asking them to complete a short questionnaire about their experience of delivering the programme. Four sessions, two on each site, will be observed to assess adherence to the programme and competence of the educators for example facilitation skills, engagement of students in the process.

Stage 3. Measuring student learning.

A quantitative approach will be used to assess before-after skills in managing cultural aspects of care with a particular focus on the notion of patient dignity and treating patients as persons.

Stage 4. Exploring student experience

Finally, semi-structured interviews are to be used to explore gained experience using semi-structured interviews with students. Content analysis using a phenomenological approach will have two research collaborators from each institution explore and analyse interviews from both settings.

We are requesting funds for the planned meetings, workshop and seminar within the research part of the project.

 

Participants 

Prof. Paul Vaucher Ph.D
University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland (HES-SO)
School of Health Sciences Fribourg

Prof. Natalia Krasilnikova Ph.D
The First State Medical University of St. Petersburg I.P. Pavlov
Department of Education and Psychology, Faculty of postgraduate Education

Mr François Allart DiO
University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland (HES-SO)
School of Health Sciences Fribourg

Prof.ass Iulia Smirnova Ph.D
The First State Medical University of St. Petersburg I.P. Pavlov
Department of Education and Psychology, Faculty of postgraduate Education

Dr. Marina Stepanova MD, DiO
The First State Medical University of St. Petersburg I.P. Pavlov
Department of Nursing Science

Mr Sandro Fossetti DiO
University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland (HES-SO)
School of Health Sciences Fribourg

Prof. Nina Vantchakova Ph.D
The First State Medical University of St. Petersburg I.P. Pavlov
Department of Education and Psychology, Faculty of postgraduate Education

Joel Liengme BSc Ost
University of Applied Sciences and Arts Western Switzerland (HES-SO)
School of Health Sciences Fribourg

Anna Barabochina BSc edu
The First State Medical University of St. Petersburg I.P. Pavlov
Department of Education and Psychology, Faculty of postgraduate Education